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King Ban of Benoic and King Bors of Gaunis in their youth
Ban and Bors were brothers. Ban was king of Banoic (Benwick), in Brittany, while Bors was king of Gaunes, or Gaul (France). They were the sons of King Lancelot and Queen Marche, who was the daughter of the King of Ireland. The descend from Nascien of Orberica a kingdom close to Sarras. 
They married the sisters Elaine and Evaine. After the death of Uther Pendragon, in the brothers old age their land is conquiered by Claudas of Terre Deserte. They died before their wives, leaving their sons destituted. (x)

Said Taghmaoui as King Ban (up) and Brahim Asloum as King Bors (down) also Coldplay’s Viva la Vida lyrics

King Ban of Benoic and King Bors of Gaunis in their youth

Ban and Bors were brothers. Ban was king of Banoic (Benwick), in Brittany, while Bors was king of Gaunes, or Gaul (France). They were the sons of King Lancelot and Queen Marche, who was the daughter of the King of Ireland. The descend from Nascien of Orberica a kingdom close to Sarras. 

They married the sisters Elaine and Evaine. After the death of Uther Pendragon, in the brothers old age their land is conquiered by Claudas of Terre Deserte. They died before their wives, leaving their sons destituted. (x)

Said Taghmaoui as King Ban (up) and Brahim Asloum as King Bors (down) also Coldplay’s Viva la Vida lyrics

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The only Hebrew version of the perennially popular Arthurian legends was written in northern Italy in 1279. […] The 13th-century Italian Jewish translator’s literary methods are as fascinating as are the Arthurian stories in Hebrew dress. The scribe not only translates from Italian, [..] he also changed and Judaized the story. The scribe’s manner of Judaization is evident at the outset of the romance; the apology itself is filled with terms from a familiar Jewish world.

Instrumental to the Judaization of the Arthurian romance are the scribe’s choice of plot (the seduction of Igerne by the king, with its parallels to the David-Bath-Sheba story), additions and omissions, use of language, and treatment of certain passages to stress Jewish ideas. For instance, the feast at which Uther meets Igerne is described in the Old French sources as a Christmas feast. In the Hebrew version, the statement “Then the king made a great feast for all the people and all the princes” (based on Esth. 2:18) conveys the aura of a Purim feast.

Another example of such transference of concepts occurs when the translator takes the talmudic word tamḥui (“a charity bowl from which food was distributed to the needy”), with its uniquely Jewish associations, to describe the grail, an overtly Christian symbol. The constant use of well-known biblical phrases reminds the reader of religious literature and produces the effect of biblical scenes in the midst of the Arthurian narrative. In this fashion, then, the text and the language interact in polyphonic fashion.

"

Jewish Virtual Library |  King Artus: A Hebrew Arthurian Romance of 1279

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bifanoland:

I guess I can finally share this!

"Vasilisa Encounters the White Horseman."                                              

Gouache on Arches 300 lb Hot Press WC paper. 

I’ll be displaying some new work and old alongside Luc Latullipe and  Mark “Atomos” Pilon for an upcoming group show at Hot Art Wet City in Vancouver, BC.

More info on it here!

http://hotartwetcity.com/electricks/

(via hopeazul)

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thingsfoundonbookshelves:

A 1963 edition of King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table by Roger Lancelyn Green. (x)

(via thesiegeperilous)

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sirensongfashion:

Vlada Roslyakova by Pierluigi Maco for Vogue China January 2007

(via notwiselybuttoowell)

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infernalfinnart:

Shields in all shapes and sizes. I love heraldry.

infernalfinnart:

Shields in all shapes and sizes. I love heraldry.

(via queen-of-love-and-beauty)

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ponshi:

leftinstitches:

amhras:

jesus only had 12 followers

but they talked to him

why don’t you guys talk to me

Seriously, I don’t even care if you’re the creepy one

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(Source: silkbone, via suco-de-abacaxis)

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medievaliz:

archivalia:

A Memento Mori as New Year greeting by Kintzertorium on Flickr. Author was Johann Kurtz saec. XVI

medievaliz:

archivalia:

A Memento Mori as New Year greeting by Kintzertorium on Flickr. Author was Johann Kurtz saec. XVI

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